US hitting encouraging milestones on virus deaths and shots

WASHINGTON (AP) — COVID-19 deaths in the U.S. have dipped below 300 a day for the first time since the early days of the disaster in March 2020, while the drive to put shots in arms approached another encouraging milestone Monday: 150 million Americans fully vaccinated.

A mask requirement sign displayed at a restaurant in Rolling Meadows, Illinois on June 17, 2021. (AP Photo/Nam Y. Huh)

The coronavirus was the third leading cause of death in the U.S. in 2020, behind heart disease and cancer, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. But now, as the outbreak loosens its grip, it has fallen down the list of the biggest killers.

CDC data suggests that more Americans are dying every day from accidents, chronic lower respiratory diseases, strokes, or Alzheimer’s disease than they are from COVID-19. The U.S. death toll stands at more than 600,000, while the worldwide count is close to 3.9 million, though the real figures in both cases are believed to be markedly higher.

Two men talk as crowds gather on L Street Beach in the South Boston neighborhood of Boston on June 5, 2021. (AP Photo/Michael Dwyer)

About 45% of the U.S. population has been fully vaccinated, according to the CDC. Over 53% of Americans have received at least one dose of vaccine. But U.S. demand for shots has slumped, to the disappointment of public health experts.

Dr. Ana Diez Roux, dean of Drexel University’s school of public health, said the dropping rates of infections and deaths are cause for celebration. But she cautioned that the virus still has a chance to spread and mutate given the low vaccination rates in some states, including Mississippi, Louisiana, Alabama, Wyoming and Idaho.

People cross a street as they make their way toward Chicago’s Wrigley Field for a baseball game on June 11. (AP Photo/Shafkat Anowar)

“So far, it looks like the vaccines we have are effective against the variants that are circulating,” Diez Roux said. “But the more time the virus is jumping from person to person, the more time there is for variants to develop, and some of those could be more dangerous.”

New cases are running at about 11,400 a day on average, down from over a quarter-million per day in early January. Average deaths per day are down to about 293, according to Johns Hopkins University, after topping out at over 3,400 in mid-January.

Silvia Guillen, 19, and her boyfriend Joseph Alvarez, 22, both from El Paso, Texas, share a kiss at Universal Studios in Universal City, California on June 15, 20210. (AP Photo/Ringo H.W. Chiu)

In New York, which suffered mightily in the spring of 2020, Gov. Andrew Cuomo tweeted on Monday that the state had 10 new deaths. At the height of the outbreak in the state, nearly 800 people a day were dying from the coronavirus.

Some states are faring worse than others. Missouri leads the nation in per-capita COVID-19 cases and is fourth behind California, Florida, and Texas in the number of new cases per day over the past week despite its significantly smaller population.

The fall will bring new waves of infection, but they will be less severe and concentrated more in places with low vaccination rates, said Amber D’Souza, a professor of epidemiology at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. “So much depends on what happens over the summer and what happens with children,” she said. “Anyone who is not vaccinated can become infected and transmit the virus.”

Meanwhile, because of regulatory hurdles and other factors, President Joe Biden is expected to fall short of his commitment to share 80 million vaccine doses with the rest of the world by the end of June, officials said Monday.

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